War Graves Page 11 (S)

Seaman ANSELME SAKI, M.N. Belgium Congo Seaman, Merchant Navy.  Age 50  Died 15.6.1944

Seaman ANSELME SAKI, Merchant Navy, was born in the Belgium Congo in 1894. He moved to Belgium between the world wars. When Germany invaded Belgium during the ‘Blitzkrieg’, all ships in port, were ordered to make for sea. By doing this, they would not fall into German hands, and thus helping the German war effort. Most of the ships made for Great Britain, although some made landfall in France. Shortly afterwards they were forced to sail once again.

Anselme Saki made Southampton, not surprisingly his new home; he lodged at Orchard Place, Southampton. Seaman Saki had survived many convoy runs, covering many thousands of miles. In June 1944, as part of the fleet to supply the allied forces in the liberation of France and ultimately Europe, he was aboard a vessel carrying war materials to Normandy, when his ship was hit by a torpedo, he was badly injured the explosion. The ship sank, and he was among those rescued from the sea. He was placed aboard a hospital ship and given immediate medical attention, but sadly, on the way back to this country, he died on Thursday 15th June 1944, as a result of the wounds he received in the loss of his ship.

Seaman ANSELME SAKI, Merchant Navy, was buried on Saturday 17th June 1944, in the War Graves Section (see plans on back pages), and is laid to rest, Row 2 Grave 16, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Sergeant JOSEPH LOWDEN SALOMONS 5379512, Sergeant, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, Airborne Division.  Age 28  Died 26.11.1942

Sergeant JOSEPH LOWDEN SALOMONS, was the son of Joseph Leopold and Marie Salmons. He was serving with the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry Regiment. One of the regiments to comprise the newly formed 6th Airborne Division. His home was at 38 Brockhurst Road, Gosport, where he lived with his wife Freda Lucy Salomons and young family; he was 28 years of age.

The new Division was undergoing extensive training in the new form of aerial warfare; parachuting and glider ascents were to become second nature during this time. On the 26th of November 1942 at the Netheravon airbase near Salisbury, his section took their places in a ‘Hotspur’ glider, which was being loaded prior to being towed into the air. During the take-off the towrope snapped, the glider with little altitude, and no air speed stalled and crashed, killing many of those aboard, including Sergeant Salomons. He would not have known it at the time, but had they survived, their battalion was being prepared for the vital task of capturing the bridges over the Caen Canal and River Orne. This was to be achieved during the first few minutes after midnight of the 6th of June 1944 – ‘D.Day’. In recognition of which, the bridge forever afterwards being nicknamed the ‘Pegasus Bridge’, and was to be the western most flank of the Allied Invasion.

Sergeant JOSEPH LOWDEN SALOMONS, was buried on Tuesday 1st December 1942, in the War Graves Section (see plans on back pages), and is laid to rest, Row 5 Grave 5. A CWG headstone commemorates him.

Gunner THOMAS SANDERCOCK, R.G.A. 15010, Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery.  Age 33  Died 30.3.1915

Gunner THOMAS SANDERCOCK, R.G.A., was the son of John Sandercock, who lived at Aldemoor, Advent, Camelford, Corwall. He was serving with the Royal Garrison Artillery, and his unit was stationed at Fort Gomer.

His artillery unit was just one of the many R.G.A. units who were manning all the forts surrounding the Solent area. They were there to protect the anchorage from attack by German shipping.

During the month’s of March. April, an outbreak of enteric fever was diagnosed. Some twenty men were affected among whom was Gunner Sandercock. He like the others were taken to the Queen Alexandria Military Hospital at Cosham, where as the days passed, his condition deteriorated. He died on the 30th of March 1915. His body was returned to Gosport, where Gunner THOMAS SANDERCOCK, R.G.A., was buried on the 1st of April 1915, being laid to rest, Plot 47 Space 17, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Sergeant WILLIAM NELSON TIMOTHY SANTRY, R.M.L.I. PO/13764, Sergt, Royal Marine Light Infantry. Age 30 Died 18.10.1920

Sergeant WILLIAM NELSON TIMOTHY SANTRY, Royal Marines Light Infantry, survived the Great War although he had been grievously wounded. He continued in the service, and was brought back to the Forton Barracks (St. Vincent), which was their home Wounded by shrapnel, which had the ability to shift slightly in the body after sometime. His condition worsened.

He was admitted to the Cottage Hospital (Field House, now demolished), and made as comfortable as possible, nothing could be done for him, the shrapnel was to close to his heart for an operation to remove it. Sergeant Santry died on the 18th of October 1920. On the 24th of October 1920, Sergeant, WILLIAM NELSON TIMOTHY SANTRY, R.M.L.I., was buried with full service honours, he is laid to rest, Plot 120 Space 1, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Obergefrieter WILLI SCHOCKE, German Air Force Obergefreiter, German Air Force.  Born 20.5.1917  Died 30.9.1940  Age 23

Obergefreiter WILLI SCHOCKE, German Air Force, was born on the 25th of July 1919, at the age of 21, he flying in a Heinkel He 111P-2 bomber, (2643) coded G1+CM, part of 4/KG55 of the German Luftwaffe. On the 30th of September 1940, he was part of a formation of some 100+ plus aircraft, whose mission was to bomb an aircraft factory at Yeovil, Somerset, approaching the coast five of the formation was shot down by RAF fighters. Still the mission had to continue, and the surviving bombers duly made their raid, which caused heavy loss of life and damage.

The raiders now relieved of bomb loads, beat a hasty retreat for their bases in France, but they still had to run the gauntlet of fighter and anti aircraft action. At some point on crossing the coast, Obergefr Schocke’s Heinkel was shot down, crashing into the sea, west of the Isle of Wight. Of the five members of the crew, Obergefr Schocke and Oberfw Guttler were killed, Gefr Bauer, Gefr Rudeck and Gefr Strauss were reported missing, the aircraft sank, probably taking them with it.

Records show that Obergefr SCHOCKE’s body was recovered from the sea in front of Fort Gilkicker, Stokes Bay, on the 14th of October 1940. Obergefrieter WILLI SCHOCKE, German Air Force, was laid to rest on Thursday 17th October 1940, in the War Graves Section, Row 7 Grave 10, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

EDWIN SCHOLZ, German Air Force 363/67412, Gefreiter, German Air Force.  Born 17.7.1923  Died 8.7.1944   Age 20

Gefreiter EDWIN SCHOLZ, German Air Force, was born on the 17th of July 1923. During the Second World War he served with the German Luftwaffe, he was shot down off the Normandy coast during the allied liberation of France. So far no trace of his unit has been found, he was however, shot down by the tremendous barrage of flak put up to protect the beach-heads, badly wounded, he was recovered from the sea after having baled out of his aircraft.

He was treated for his wounds, but on the way back to this Country for hospitalisation, he died of his wounds on Monday the 8th of July 1944. Gefreiter EDWIN SCHOLZ, German Air Force, was buried on Monday 10th July 1944, in the German Plot, of the war Graves Section (see plans on back pages), AND IS LAID TO REST, Row 3 Grave 4, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Petty Officer LENOX SCOTT, R.N. F/M 38548, Sick Bay Petty Officer, Royal Navy.  Age 34   Died 3.5.1941                                              Interred with wife Emily, daughter Isabel. No. 157 Grove Road, Gosport. SEE – Mrs VIOLET ROASELEA BARNARD

Mr ERNEST EDWARD SEABROOK  Age 64 Mrs EMMA ELIZABETH SEABROOK Age 66    No. 85 Leesland Road, Gosport. Died 20.9.1941  SEE – Mrs ADA EMMA BROWN

Lieutenant ARTHUR PENROSE SELWYN, R.F.C.2nd Lieutenant, King Edward’s Own Lancers (Probyn Horse), attached to the Royal Flying Corps.  Age 26  Died 18.5.1916                                                             SEE – Lieutenant GEORGE SIMPSON BATEMAN, R.F.C.

Flight Sergeant WILBER JOSEPH SHAVER, R.C.A.F. 137419, Flight Sergeant, Pilot, Royal Canadian Air Force.  Age 21  Died 16.8.1943       SEE – Sergeant MALCOLM DOBBIE, R.A.F.

Warrant Officer EDWARD GEORGE SHEARMAN, R.Q.M.S. 1420997, Battery Warrant Officer, Regimental Quarter Masters Stores.  Age 39  Died 8.8.1943

Warrant Officer, EDWARD GEORGE SHEARMAN, Regimental Quarter Masters Stores, was the son of George and Ethel Gertrude Shearman. He was also the husband of Kitty Barbara Shearman, and they lived at No.62, Elson Road, Gosport. W.O. Shearman, was a survivor of Dunkirk. passed away on Sunday 8th August 1943, at the War Memorial Hospital, Gosport, as a result of wounds received during war operations. Warrant Officer EDWARD GEORGE SHEARMAN, was buried on Thursday 12th August 1943, and is laid to rest, Plot 67 Space 66, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Musician ALBERT WILLIAM SILLENCE, R.N. RMB/X 467, Musician, Royal Marines Band.   Age 28  Died 24.6.1946

Musician ALBERT WILLIAM SILLENCE, Royal Marines, was the son of William and Rose Sillence. Lived in Bridgemary, with his wife Edna L. Once again it is not known the cause of his death, but given the date, it was probably as a result of a medical condition, brought about by his service. He passed away on Monday 24th of June 1946, after being admitted to the Gosport War Memorial Hospital. Musician ALBERT WILLIAM SILLENCE, R.M., was buried on Friday 28th of June 1946, he is laid to rest Plot 18 Space 19, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

ALFRID SIVLER  Soldier, German Army.  Age 19  Died 24.8.1944

ALFRID SIVLER, German Army, was seriously wounded, during the breakout of the allied forces, from the Normandy Beaches, as the allies effected the liberation of France. He was yet another soldier who was ordered to put up a last ditch ‘suicide’ operation to allow his countrymen to escape from the Falaise area of Normandy. He was taken aboard a hospital ship, for transport to this country, Despite the care he received, he died of this wounds on Thursday 24th August 1944, whilst on the trip back.

ALFRID SIVLER, was buried on Saturday 26th August 1944, in the German Plot, of the War Graves Section, and is laid to rest, Row 1 Grave 2, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Sapper JAMES REGINALD SLAUGHTER, R.E. 2682, Sapper, Hants Fortress Company, Royal Engineers.  Age 21  Died 20.12.1916

Sapper JAMES REGINALD SLAUGHTER, R.E., was the son of  M.C. Parsons (formerly Slaughter), and the late J.G. Slaughter (Chief Shipwright HMS Good Hope), who lived in married quarters at No.5, Mill Pond Road, Forton, Gosport. He was serving with the 48th Company Anti Aircraft Section of the Royal Engineers, and was stationed at Fort Gomer. This fort was part of the mid 1800’s Victorian fortifications which were mockingly known as ‘Palmerston’s Follies’, as they were never used in action to repel a possible French invasion.

The conditions in these forts were damp and cold, many were the servicemen who were to be become ill, who were billeted in them. Sapper Slaughter, had been on an all night watch, the weather for the previous week had been extremely cold and wet, he went to bed, he did not feel very well. He failed to respond to the roll call, and an N.C.O. was sent to find him. He was found to be shivering, and running a high temperature. He was immediately taken to the medical quarters; a doctor diagnosed a fever. He was taken to Portsmouth, where he was placed in isolation in the Infectious Decease’s Hospital, Milton, Portsmouth. He was found to have meningitis and a very contagious type at that. His condition rapidly deteriorated, and he passed away on the 20th of December 1916, aged just 21. Sapper JAMES REGINALD SLAUGHTER, R.E., was brought back to Gosport, where he was buried on the 23rd of December 1916, he is laid to rest, Plot 81 Space 12, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Corporal WILLIAM HENRY CHARD SMALE, R.M.L.I. PO/8596, Corporal Musician, Royal Marine Light Infantry.  Age 38  Died 18.7.1918

Corporal, WILLIAM HENRY CHARD SMALE, R.M.L.I., was a member of the Royal Marine Light Infantry Band. He had been a member of the R.M.L.I. since he had joined whilst a boy. He had served in the Boer War, and in India. His home barracks were those at Forton Road, Gosport. His unit had been serving in France, he had been wounded during an attack on a German stronghold, which had been causing heavy casualties amongst his fellow soldiers. He was one of thirty men who launched a determined rush at the pillbox.

He was hit in the leg and thigh, the units war diary discloses that he continued to fire his rifle at the stronghold, two men who had managed to get to the side of the German pill box, threw two grenades through the gun slit, the stronghold had been silenced. Six men were killed nine wounded, of which Corporal Smale was one. He was treated in France and his condition improved, he was brought back to this country and admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar, Gosport. After several weeks he was released to Forton Barracks. Sadly secondary infection set into his wounds, he was taken to Haslar for further treatment, but developed blood poisoning, as a result of which he died on the 18th of July 1918.

Corporal, WILLIAM HENRY CHARD SMALE, R.M.L.I., was buried on the 23rd of July 1918, with full service honours, and is laid to rest, Plot 38 Space 56, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Private FREDERICK SMITH 46539, Private, 17th (Res.) Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Light Infantry.  Age 36  Died 24.3.1915

Private FREDERICK SMITH, was the son of the late Serjt J. Smith and the late Mary Ann Lancaster (formerly Smith), who lived at No. 50 Richmond Road, Gosport. He was serving with the Princess Patricia’s Light Infantry, which was part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Was at home, he was awaiting his mobilisation. He had continued to work in his civilian employment. He caught a cold, which developed into pneumonia, from which he never recovered, passing away on the 24th March 1915. Private FREDERICK SMITH, was buried on the 29th March 1915, and is laid to rest, Plot 139 Space 5. A CWG headstone commemorates him.

Gunner HERBERT HENRY SMITH, R.G.A. 195098, Gunner, Royal Garrison Artillery.  Age 26  Died 11.9.1918

Gunner HERBERT HENRY SMITH, Royal Garrison Artillery, was serving with the Anti Aircraft Depot unit, at Fort Monckton. He was billeted in the Monckton Hutment’s, housed in the former Detention Barracks wing. He was another serviceman who was out in all weathers, during the nighttime. Gunner Smith, went down with a cold, this turned into a chesty condition, he developed breathing difficulties, suffering from pneumonia. He died on the 11th of November 1918, as a result of contracting the ‘Spanish Flu’ epidemic, which raged throughout war torn Europe. Somewhere in the region of a million people died after becoming infected. Gunner HERBERT HENRY SMITH, R.G.A., was laid to rest, Plot 38 Space 75, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Marine FRANK WILLIAM SMITH, R.M. PO/X 2664, Marine, Royal Marines.   Age 20  Died 16.11.1940

Marine FRANK WILLIAM SMITH, Royal Marines, was the son of Guy James and Olive Jane, who lived at No. 7 Millpond Road, Gosport. Marine Smith passed away on Saturday 16th November 1940, at Glasgow Hospital, Scotland, as a result of wounds received during the heavy air raids on the dock’s area. Marine Smith was struck by shrapnel, when a bomb exploded on the opposite side of the road. Grievously wounded, he was taken to hospital, where he died on the operating table, during an operation to remove the shrapnel. His death certificate had to be issued by the Coroner’s Court, Glasgow.

Marine FRANK WILLIAM SMITH, R.M., was returned to Gosport at the request of a relative, and was buried on Friday 22nd of November 1940, and is laid to rest, Plot 34 Space 72, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Private FREDERICK STEPHEN SMITH 6213014, Private, Middlesex Regiment   Age 20   Died 28.8.1940

At an Inquest held on the 3rd September 1940. The Coroner for South Hants, Major G.H. Warner, enquired into the circumstances, in which Private FREDERICK STEPHEN SMITH, of the Middlesex Regiment, met with his death. Private Smith, was the son of James Henry and Jane Beatrice Smith of Tooting, Surrey. The Middlesex Regiment, were based at the New Barracks (St. George’s), Gosport. He was on a course in weapon handling at the ‘Machine Gun Training Centre’ also at the barracks. He was 20 years of age, and was single. His home was at No. 38 Rectory Lane, Tooting, London SW1. He was found on the floor of his sleeping quarters within the barracks. He was found with a gunshot wound to his head. Still alive, he was immediately taken to Haslar Hospital, where he died of his wounds on Wednesday 28th August 1940. Colour Sergeant Major Lawrence McKie stated that ‘ a rifle was found lying across two beds in the Quarters, and that upon inspection of the rifle’s magazine, it was noted that one round of ammunition had been discharged. Smith was examined and found to have cuts on his wrist, and a blood stained safety razor blade was found nearby. Private Smith had been in the army, three and half months, he had been depressed and unwell of late.’ A verdict was returned that, Private Frederick Stephen Smith (6213014), late of the Middlesex Regiment, based at the New Barracks, Gosport, – ‘Had shot himself whilst the balance of his mind was disturbed’

Private FREDERICK STEPHEN SMITH was buried on Tuesday 3rd September 1940. He is laid to rest in the War Graves Section, Row 6 Grave 2, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Private ROBERT DUNCANSON SMITH 6215447, Private Middlesex Regiment.   Age 29   Died 7.12.1940

Private ROBERT DUNCANSON SMITH, was the son of Robert Duncanson and Agnes Cumming Smith, of Glasgow, Scotland. He was based at the New Barracks (St. George’s), which was the home of the 342nd Machine Gun Training Centre. During the night of Friday 6th December 1940, Gosport suffered one of the heaviest air raids it would receive during the Second World War. Widespread damage and heavy casualties were caused. Private Smith, was on duty at the Barracks, and was badly wounded in the air raid, after being hit by shrapnel of an exploding bomb. He was taken to the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar, Gosport. Sadly his wounds were so serious, that he passed away, in the early hours of the next morning – Saturday 7th December 1940.

Private ROBERT DUNCANSON SMITH, was buried on Wednesday 11th of December 1940, and is laid to rest in the War Graves Section, Row 5 Grave 2, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Colour Sergeant Major HORACE SAMUEL SNELL,R.M.L.I. PO/7121 Colour Sergeant Major, R Marine Light Infantry.  Age 39 Died 22.10.1919

Colour Sergeant Major, HORACE SAMUEL SNELL, was serving with the Royal Marine Light Infantry, he had not long returned from France, after seeing action in the Great War. During the late autumn of 1919, which turned very cold, he caught a chill. His condition soon worsened, and he was admitted to the Royal Naval Hospital at Haslar, Gosport, where he was diagnosed as having influenza. At this time the ‘Spanish Flu’ epidemic, which raged throughout war torn Europe. Somewhere in the region of a million people died after becoming infected. CSM SNELL died several days later on the 22nd of October 1919.

Colour Sergeant Major, HORACE SAMUEL SNELL, R.M.L.I., was buried on the 27th of October 1919. He is laid to rest, Plot 56 Space 50, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone

Private HORACE SPICER 10579, Private, Leicestershire Regiment.    Age 22   Died 16.8.1914

Private HORACE SPICER was serving with the Leicestershire Regiment. It is thought he had volunteered for service at the outbreak of war. Whether his death was as a result of war wounds or a medical condition, is not known. We do know that ht passed away in the Royal Naval Hospital at Haslar on the 16th of August 1914, cause not recorded. Private HORACE SPICER, was buried on the 19th of August 1914, and is laid to rest, Plot 58 Space 16, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Sergeant TOM OWEN STARKEY, R.F.A. Sergeant, 68th Company, Royal Field Artillery.   Age 33   Died 24.11.1914

Sergeant TOM OWEN STARKEY, R.F.A., was the husband of Sarah Ellen Starkey; they lived at No. 5 Walpole Terrace, Alver Road, Gosport. He was a member of the Territorial Army, and they had volunteered for service abroad. He was wounded in action, and was convalescing at home, he caught a cold which developed into pneumonia, and he passed away at his home on the early morning of the 24th of November 1914. Sergeant TOM OWEN STARKEY, R.F.A., was buried on the 28th November 1914, and was laid to rest, Plot 47 Space 17, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Wren GLADYS IRENE STEPHENS, W.R.N.S.  3800, Writer, Women’s Royal Naval Srv, HMS Collingwood. Age 44Died 2.1.1941

Wren Writer GLADYS IRENE STEPHENS, Women’s Royal Naval Service, was the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Pout. She was also the wife of Morley John Stephens, and they lived at No.6, Foster Road. She was serving at HMS Collingwood, some three miles away. Wren Stephens, passed away at her home, on Thursday 2nd January 1941, the cause is thought to have been pneumonia. Wren Writer GLADYS IRENE STEPHENS, W.R.N.S., was buried on Monday 6th January 1941, being laid to rest, Plot 26 Space 62, and her final resting place is commemorated by a CWG headstone.

Corporal, THOMAS EDWIN STEVENS Corporal, 6204151 1st Battalion, Princess Louise’s Regiment,   Age 30  Mrs MARGERET STEVENS  Miss JOYCE A. STEVENS Master THOMAS EDWARD STEVENS  Miss MARGERET ESTHER STEVENS Master KEITH FREDERICK STEVENS  Ages 30,25,9,4,30 months & 13 months       Died 6.12.1940                                                                 SEE – Mrs EVE DOROTHY & MAUREEN EVELYN ISAACS

Corporal ALLAN JAMES STEWART, R.A.F. 334962, Corporal, Royal Air Force.  Age 48  Died 16.8.1940 SEE – Corporal GEORGE ATKINSON, R.A.F.

Mr GEORGE STOKES Motor Driver  No. 19 Gordon Road, Gosport Age 28   Died17.3.1941   SEE – Mr WILLIAM BURRAGE

Mr TOM GEORGE STRIDE Labourer  No. 17 Holly Street, Gosport. Age 62  Died 14.6.1941      SEE – Mr WILLIAM HENRY BARNES

Chief Petty Officer GEORGE THOMAS STURMEY, R.N. P/J 105928, Chief Petty Officer, Royal Navy, HMS Sandwich.  Age 34  Died 16.4.1941

Chief Petty Officer GEORGE THOMAS STURMEY, Royal Navy, was the son of Walter George and Mary Sturmey of Gosport. He was also the husband of Dorothy Hilda Sturmey of East Finchley, Middlesex. They lived at No., 2 Willow Place, Gosport. He was serving at HMS Sandwich. My research indicates that he served aboard a Destroyer Escort vessel, which plied the Atlantic Ocean trying to protect the ships of the convoy from air or submarine attack. On the night of Wednesday 16th April 1941, his ship was berthed in the Birkenhead docks area. The docks were subjected to one of the heaviest air raids of the war that night. Despite intense anti aircraft fire from ship and shore alike, the German raiders were just above the range of the shells. The bombers immune to the flak, ‘blanket bombed’ the docks. The result was severe. Many ships were sunk at their moorings, others so badly damaged that they had to be scrapped. The cost in lives was terribly high. Amongst the hundreds killed or wounded during the raid, was C.P.O. Sturmey. He was killed when a large piece of shrapnel hit him, killing him instantly.

Chief Petty Officer, GEORGE THOMAS STURMEY, R.N., was brought back to Gosport, where he was buried on Monday 24th April 1941. He is laid to rest, Plot 61 Space 52, and is commemorated by a Family Memorial.

Sapper WILLIAM PATON FAIRBRIDGE SUTHERLAND, R.E. 364614, Sapper, Royal Engineers.   Age 34   Died 7.11.1918

Sapper WILLIAM PATON FAIRBRIDGE SUTHERLAND, Royal Engineers, was the son of Paton Elizabeth Sutherland, who lived at No. 18 St. George’s Square, Forest Gate, Essex. He was serving with the London Electrical Company, under the command of the Royal Engineers. His unit was tasked with manning a searchlight unit, which was self-powered by a generator, mounted on a truck. They were responsible for illuminating the night skies over the capital when an air raid was in progress.

The hope was that once illuminated the airship or aeroplane could be targeted by the anti aircraft batteries dotted around the city, and shot down. During the cold autumn and the start of the winter, he caught influenza and died on the 7th of November 1918, as a result of contracting the ‘Spanish Flu’ epidemic, which raged throughout war torn Europe. Somewhere in the region of a million people died after becoming infected. Sapper WILLIAM PATON FAIRBRIDGE SUTHERLAND, R.E., was laid to rest, Plot 39 Space 30, and is commemorated by a CWG headstone.